Peer-to-peer boat sharing (Part 2)

In an earlier post, we discussed the growth of peer-to-peer boat sharing initiatives. Some companies who facilitate exchanges between boat owners and consumers have released statistics outlining their managing of thousands of boats stationed throughout hundreds of American cities. Other organizations have boasted figures of overseeing more than 10,000 boats stationed throughout 52 countries. 

It's still too early to determine how successful of an enterprise peer-to-peer boat sharing will become. Nevertheless, the costs of maintaining, stationing and insuring a boat stands out as one of the leading motivators for the industry, according to Trade Only Today. Peer-to-peer sharing allows boat owners to offset some of those costs. This is why, with the boating industry earning $35 billion yearly and serving a market where 75 percent of all boat owners earn less than $100,000 annually, the potential for peer-to-peer boat sharing is evident. 

One of the obvious benefits of partnering with a p2p platform is that many of them supply insurance offerings. Shawn Gardner, co-founder and CEO of Fun2rent.com, says that peer-to-peer organizations often provide better insurance options on account of typical rental companies not having the inventory to provide coverage on something like hull damage. 

"When you rent from these private rental companies, if you total the boat it's coming out of your paycheck," Gardner says. "We have better rental insurance than most of the companies out there."

Other incentives include no membership fees, simple boat listings, total autonomy over who rents your vessel and when it is rented and access to an entire boating community that has no geographic limitations. 

The future of p2p boat sharing may be uncertain but you can certainly contact ePal about the best boat parts and boat accessories today. We have all of the products you need. 

Peer-to-peer boat sharing (Part 1)

The internet has been a life-changing tool for all humanity, affecting everything from the way we learn and shop to how we do business and entertain ourselves. Perhaps one of the most controversial elements of the World Wide Web is how accessible it's made us to each other. Social media platforms have given us a chance to connect with long lost friends from our youth but they've also been the source of heated debates over privacy issues and concerns about information security. 

New business initiatives like crowdsourcing for information and crowdfunding for financial support have also risen from this new accessibility. We're now able to utilize peer-to-peer initiatives through our smartphones and find a stranger willing to loan their car or use it to taxi us around town. That's why it was only a matter of time before technology caught up with the way we use our boats. 

According to statistics provided by the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA), a boat owner's vessel can sit unused for roughly 339 days annually, while still incurring insurance, maintenance and storage fees along with other expenses. According to a Trade Only Today article, this is the condition that has led to the rise of a handful of companies who facilitate peer-to-peer boat sharing initiatives. 

Requirements to engage this service often mean completing questionnaires, affidavits and possessing a minimum of two years of boating experience, although the requisites vary among the different organizations. Fraud protection checks are utilized as well as this is a relatively new enterprise that carries uncertainties along with its potential benefits.

Ultimately, whether a boat is used in a peer-to-peer boat sharing service is up to the owner. Nevertheless, if you're an owner looking to improve your vessel with the best boat accessories and boat parts, contact ePal today for all the products you need! 

Tips on how to catch elusive fish (Part 2)

In a previous blog entry, we discussed how some fish will try to make you work a little harder than others when trying to make a catch and what you can do to get through these trouble spots.

Here are a few more tips:

Chase catfish at night: Catfish are warm water fish that, by midsummer, are looking to feed heavily. This makes the optimal fishing time between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. when the fish are moving out of the deeper waters to find food.

Go long: One way of raising your chances of catching more fish is so simple it's easy to overlook. Casting out further away means that you're covering more territory and giving yourself more options. One of the most effective ways to add distance to your cast is to use a lightweight line.

Watch the birds: Saltwater anglers are known for using the birds to find an ideal spot to catch fish but there are intricacies to this art. For example, some inshore birds like terns will favor smaller bait like sandeels and bay anchovies. But watching where the gulls head will lead you to larger bait fish like mackerel and herring. Meanwhile, cormorants will chase anything that's moving in the water. Offshore birds like petrels can lead you to shrimp catches but they also tend to feed on shrimp and plankton.

The best approach to using birds to your advantage is patience. Watch them long enough to see if a pattern unfolds and reveals whether there are fish in the nearby area or if they're as hungry as you are. A flock of birds suddenly changing course to a specific destination is usually a good sign. But if a large group of birds looks like it's resided to fly off and seek out something promising, it may serve you to follow their lead.

Remember, ePal has all of the boat parts and fishing boat accessories you'll need to make the most of your time on the water. Contact us today!

Tips on how to catch elusive fish (Part 1)

Providing the best fishing boat accessories is just one of the ways ePal helps its customers. We want people to love their time on the water as much as we do. But sometimes having the best equipment isn't always enough. A little cunning can go along way too, especially when it comes to getting fish to take the bait.  

Here are a couple of tips on how you can enhance your chances of filling your boat with a tasty bounty: 

Avoid getting rocked: Sometimes it's unavoidable that, when fishing, you run the risk of being "rocked," as a bold fish snatches a lure or bait and then buries its head in the rocks, kelp or weeds. Usually, you're not left with many options other than cutting the line, but there are a few tricks you can try. 

Instead of pulling back on the line as instincts would suggest, sometimes doing just the opposite works. Dip the front of the rod toward the water and allow the line to go slack, which may lead a fish to think it doesn't need cover any more and will cause it to retreat from its protection. Alternatively, you can pull back gently on the rod and pluck the line like it's a guitar string, sometimes annoying the fish to the point of trying to escape you. As a last resort, weight the anchor and move to a new position to try to yank the fish free from a different angle. 

Make use of flooding: Bow-fishermen have long made use of flooded waters. Carp and gar are particularly known for swarming overflowing banks in search of food, often inching along and leaving their backs exposed for some of the easiest shooting there is. 

Nevertheless, the value of a good fishfinder and other boat accessories can't be overstated either. Contact ePal today for all of the fishing and boating products you need. 

What to do when your boat is sinking

The subject of a boat sinking often goes overlooked because of the common assumption that a boat sinking is a rare event or the consequence of recklessness or negligence. Sometimes this is the case. But inclement weather, malfunctioning parts or a poorly designed vessel also frequently contribute to a boat going under. Aside from the headaches even the thought of such a mishap can cause, especially when one thinks about the fuel or oil pollution fines that may be heaped on top of the property loss, what's most important is knowing what to do in the event of such a disaster. 

Here are a pair of tips: 

Find the leak: Once you find the leak, you can try to plug it with balled up clothes, boots or anything else that may fit to stem the flow. Also, moving as many items and people as possible to the opposite side of the boat will help slow the leak as well, even if the boat doesn't tip enough for the hole to clear the water.

Put on the life jackets and make a mayday call: This seems like a common sense piece of advice but scary situations often produce bizarre and panicky behavior. Perhaps the greatest counsel anybody could offer for such a tense moment is to breathe deeply and maintain your calm. But hailing the Coast Guard on VHF Channel 16 to provide your location and the number of people aboard along with preparing for the inevitability of being immersed in water are crucial as well. Also, don't forget the ditch bag you use to store signal flares, a waterproof handheld VHF and a personal beacon locator. 

Also, if you're looking to learn about what marine accessories would best serve you in such an unfortunate situation and advice on the most dependable boat parts for your vessel, ePal has everything you need and more. Contact us today!

3 tips on how to release a fish

Catch and release has become a more popular practice with fishing for a number of reasons. Some species are required by law to be returned to the water, some release fish in the interest of conservation and others simply refuse to kill something they won't eat. Nonetheless, knowing how to release a fish properly is most important, otherwise the fish may end up dying anyway. 

Here are three tips on how to safely release a fish back to the water: 

Handle with care: Cradling a fish by its lip puts stress on its jaw and internal organs. Also the gills of a fish are extremely sensitive and can be easily damaged. Holding it horizontally and keeping your hands around the lower jaw area or the belly are the best ways to prevent injury.

Land the fish quickly: Exhaustion is one of the most crucial factors regarding a fish's survival. Also, the energy level of a fish especially becomes unpredictable during warm weather when higher-temperature water means lower dissolved oxygen levels for the fish to rely on, resulting in quicker and more intense incidents of stress and fatigue for the fish. Ending the fight as quickly as possible elevates the chances of survival significantly. 

Mind the hook: Barbless hooks are ideal when planning on throwing fish back as they are easier to remove and minimize the chances of punctured fingers during the process. Long-nose pliers are also a handy tool for smooth removals. Another trick that can be used is holding the fish upside-down which sometimes helps pacify it and reduce the overall time needed to remove the hook.   

Also, if you're looking for a fishfinder or any other fishing boat accessories, visit ePal Inc. today!

Police cracking down on drunk boating

According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 62 boating deaths occurred in 2013. With alcohol being suspected to have played a role in many of the incidents, and some of them having a high profile nature, Florida law enforcement has begun addressing safe boat driving concerns more aggressively, especially in regard to people operating a boat while drinking alcohol. This past Sunday, August 10, the Miami-Dade Police Department's Marine Patrol was out on the waters testing anyone who was suspected of being under the influence of a controlled substance. 

"The word will get out that we're going to stop you," Lupo Jimenez with the Miami-Dade Police Department told CBS Miami. "If you've been drinking and you're operating a boat, we're going to handle it the same way we would handle a DUI." 

The police believe that there presence on the water alone is enough to deter irresponsible behavior. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission confirmed for Miami's CBS local that they are still investigating this year's most deadly boating crash to date, resulting in the death's of the operator and three others after Independence Day fireworks. The operator's blood alcohol level has not been released but it is widely suspected that he had been driving while intoxicated. And just a week ago, a father of four died when his boat crashed into a pier at Pelican Harbor. 

Along with looking to protect drivers from themselves, a heightened presence of police on the waters will provide extra comfort to families with children who are looking to avoid anybody riding while under the influence.

Staying safe should be everyone's top priority while enjoying your time on the water. And, as always, for any of your boating and boat accessory needs, contact ePal Inc. Our array of products, and knowledgeable customer service, are just what you're looking for to enjoy the rest of this summer.

Teachers teach math through boat-building

When thinking about possible summer school assignments, working on a boat at a country club probably wouldn't instinctively rank high on your list. But two teachers from Hamden Middle School of Hamden, Connecticut, have found a way to create a harmonious union between boating and math lessons.

Andrew Marzano, an eighth-grade science teacher, and Frank Kachmar, a technology teacher, have teamed up to educate eighth-grade students on math and science skills by helping them build a sailboat. Marzano said that the idea of combining boat-building with math and science lessons came to him after watching people build boats at Connecticut's Mystic Seaport, the largest maritime museum in the world. 

The three-week program was designed to meet the needs of students who have faced challenges with math and science and incorporates principles about angles, measurements and adding and subtracting fractions into the curriculum. According to the New Hampshire register, Marazano especially sees value in the boat-building initiative because it "really incorporates math, science, history and English." 

Marazono also enjoys seeing students who "work better with their hands, rather than a pencil and notebook" making the connections between math and building boats, and growing excited about the two as the project continues.

"They start to see it's not just a hammer and nails, but that it's actually something functional," Marzano said.

Michael Cox, one of the students in the program, expressed his enthusiasm for building the boats, specifically when learning how to measure the seats properly. 

If building an entire boat is a little more work than you're looking to do, maybe finding some high quality boat accessories like a handheld marine gps are more your speed. These products an more are available through ePal Inc. at great prices. Contact us today!

3 tips for safer boating with pets

There is still a good amount of time left in the summer for boating adventures. And it's never a bad time to consider the best ways to share those rides with your pets. Boating with a furry friend can be a great bonding experience, especially when you plan ahead for any complications that may arise. So here are a few tips to help minimize the challenges that come with bringing a four-legged loved one aboard:

Adjusting to the Boat: As it goes with most pets and new items, especially young pets, incrementally introducing them to the boat and water is best. Letting him or her run around the deck while the boat is docked or just turning on the engine so your pet can acclimate to its sounds and smells are great for helping your pet learn to love the experience naturally. A few small cruises to fully introduce the pet to the riding experience would ensure that a lengthy ride in the future would go smoother.  

Flotation Devices: Even if your pet is a good swimmer, falling into water unexpectedly, as dogs occasionally do when trying to leap from a boat to the dock, can throw anyone into a panic. A pet life jacket is, at least, a great way to protect your pet from his or her own clumsiness. 

Using the bathroom: Creating a space for your pet to use the bathroom may be one of the most daunting challenges. Cats are relatively easier, as a litter box can fit in most areas, but dogs can prove to be a little more complicated. If there are no planned stops on land for the dog to go ashore and handle his or her business, then a portable dog potty may be your best bet.

And if you're looking for any boat accessories or other products, visit ePal Inc. today!

3 tips for staying safe on the water

The start of summer has many boat owners out on the water with friends and family. While boating is a wonderful recreational summertime activity, if skippers or passengers are not taking all precautions, it can end badly.

In Chicago over the weekend, for example, a 33-foot-long motor boat capsized on Lake Michigan, casting four passengers into the chilly waters. One man was found 12 hours after the time of the accident, floating on life jackets. He is the only known survivor at this time, and the cause for the accident remains a mystery according to the report from the Chicago Tribune.

While the case in Chicago is still under investigation, it is important to keep in mind that preventative measures on and off land can ensure the safety of all aboard your boat.

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) offers some memorable tips for safe boating this summer:

Don't drink and drive- Boating under the influence is both dangerous and illegal. The USCG says that "alcohol is more hazardous on water than on land. The marine environment – motion, vibration, engine noise, sun, wind and spray – accelerates a drinker's impairment. These stressors cause fatigue that makes a boat operator's coordination, judgment and reaction time decline even faster when using alcohol."

Undergo a vessel check- A free and beneficial service, a vessel check is done by a certified examiner at a time that is good for both parties. With no charge and no consequence if your boat is missing a key element, or has something fundamentally wrong, having your boat checked out before it goes in the water is a great way to ensure safe travels this summer.

Wear a life jacket! According to statistics presented by the USCG, the chance of drowning while wearing a life jacket are 1 in 66, whereas the chances without a life jacket are 1 in 11. In fact, it is unlawful to not have an equal person to life jacket ratio aboard your vessel.

As always, for all your boat accessories, look to ePal Inc. Our array of products, and knowledgeable customer service, are sure to get you everything you need to have a safe and fun time on the water this summer.